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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 377 (some duplicates have been removed)
and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being here. as i said, we're grailsd with th
the san francisco civil rights ordinance. i am tiny [inaudible] and my comments are on behalf for a safe san francisco. as you know the coalition worked to address accountability and transparency and san francisco police department relationship with federal counter terrorism agencies and one that we worked on is within the san francisco police department between the federal bureau of investigation in the joint task force. as part of that relationship sfpd entered into a secret agreement with the fbi that did away with decades of progress in san francisco. members of this coalition have worked with supervisor jane kim's office to pass this ordinance and make sure that local and state standards apply and requires transparency in the process and that the chief issue a report on the mission by them. this was supported by civil rights organizations, community and bar organizations. it was passed unanimously by the board of supervisors and signed into law by the mayor. these groups say by authority of law we demand transparency and accountability and for that reason we're disappointed we
in the civil rights movement. this is about an hour 15 spirited. >> thank you, mr. hale. thank you, atlanta. atlanta history center. i have been heretofore. and glad to be back. i am glad to be back talking about something that has been a subject that has been due to me my whole life and is inescapable now . i'm getting older, is my life's work a lamb glad for it. this is another round. i beg to take more questions tonight than i normally do. i am going to try to sell some provocative things about why i think this history is significant and about this project itself, which is a little odd, to spend 24 years writing a 2300 page trilogy and then come out a few years later with a 190 page book. a lot of people who have read some of the other was think that it is probably not true that i am -- that somebody else ready of them not capable of writing something this brief. a sure you, i did. there is blood on the floor in my office because it involved eliminating or setting aside 95 percent of what worked so hard to produce in the interest of finding the most salient parts in the original language
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
and inspired by the he revolution of 1960's and he became very involved in the civil rights activism and supporting different classes here in san francisco. he loved and grew medical cannabis and was a founding father of the patient movement and believing that everyone was-available to the medical cannabis regardless of ability to pay and he was. we are sorry about his passing, but are gravel that we got a chance to know johnathan and we will always remember him. the second item, is a resolution that i'm intrusioning declaring february fourth 2013-february 10th 2013, financial aid awareness week. and i want to thank the following my colleagues the following colleagues who have co sponsored this resolution supervisors avalos, breed, chiu, farrell, kim, mar and wiener. higher education truly is the key to success in this country and the ability of many students to attend an institution of of higher learning is based largely on their ability to secure financial assistance. i know from my own personal experience i'll not be here today sitting in this chair without the ability to have
collection. (applause) >> thank you. during his undergraduate years at ucla he participated in civil rights and anti-war protests and many of his subsequent writings reflects his experiences by stressing the importance of grassroots political activity in the african-american freedom struggle. his first book, end struggle snick and the black awakening of the 1960s remains a definitive history of student nonviolent coordinating committee, one of the most dynamic and innovative civil rights organizations of our time. he served as senior advisor for a 14-part award winning public television series on civil rights entitled "eyes on the prize." i know we all remember that. (applause) >> his recent, his recent publication, the book, martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr., a memoir about his transition from being a teenage participant in the march on washington to becoming a historian and an educator and, of course, if you sign up for a membership you can get that book today. it's here. in 1985 he was invited by coretta scott king to direct a long-term project to edit
on a city bus in montgomery, alabama. an act of resistance that launch the modern-day civil rights movement. today, we spend the hour looking at her life. >> we have one of the most famous americans of the 20th- century treated like a children's book hero, not seen as being worthy of a substantive, scholarly treatment. that is what surprised me and continues to surprise me, the ways that we diminish her legacy by making it about a single day, a single act, as opposed to the rich and lifelong history of resistance that was actually who rosa parks was. >> we speak with historian jeanne theoharis, her new book, "the rebellious life of mrs. rosa parks." all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has granted itself the right to launch a pre-emptive strike on foreign targets. cyber attacks would be carried out, should the what has been the necessary, to prevent an imminent and dangerous attack from abroad. the authorization was part of a pending set of rules for cyber warfare. it would fall under the o
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
and commemorating the modern civil rights leader for her courageous and declaring -- for her courageousness and declaring february 4th rosa parks day in san francisco. (applause) >> i thought you might like that. i'm done. thank you. [laughter] >> thank you. supervisor. and now there are a couple other people, sheriff mirkarimi has joined us. [speaker not understood] is in the room with us as well. reverend amos brown is with us. welcome. (applause) >> now supervisor breed will bring us brief remarks. >> hi, everybody. (applause) >> so happy to see all your smiling faces in the audience. happy black history month. i bring you greetings on behalf of district 5 in our great city. thank you, mr. mayor, for opening up city hall to my colleague, supervisor cohen, and my distinguished colleagues sitting here in the front row on the board of supervisors. it's truly an honor to stand before you on such a great month. recent -- yesterday congresswoman barbara lee talked about dr. martin luther king and his dream and some of the issues that we were dealing with over 40 years ago are some of the same
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
equality the cornerstone of his career. as a civil rights lawyer, he sued the housing authority to improve the standards of living for public housing tenants. and he also sued the fire department so women and people of color could get equal opportunity. as the director of this city's human rights commission, he expanded contracting opportunities for women and people of color. and today as mayor, he makes sure our city government reflects the diversity of this great city. on monday we were together, as i mentioned earlier, i college track on 3rd street in bayview where the mayor give his state of the city address. his administration's focus is on creating jobs, making sure that all of our residents have access to those jobs,st and from local hireness and job readiness, training and placement, we are moving towards equality for all with the mayor's leadership. ladies and gentlemen, i'd like to introduce the 43rd mayor of san francisco, mayor edwin lee. (applause) >> good afternoon, everyone. all right. welcome to city hall and happy black history month here in san francisco. nobody got it be
. he also reminds us of our history. there has been no civil rights or human rights movement in which the faith communities and its leaders have not been at the forefront and i look at dr. and he is a living reminder of that truth. at the heart of civil rights movement in the years 1963 and 1964 before there was a san francisco interface council there was the san francisco conference on religion, race and social concerns which for 25 years was the voice of social justice in the city and county of san francisco. it was that movement that gave birth to the san francisco interfaith council whose mission it is to bring people together of different faiths, to celebrate our diverse spiritual and religious traditions, build understanding, and serve our city. it was a previous mayor that challenged the interface council to step up to the place, to respond to its moral responsibility to care for the homeless at a time of crisis spun out of control, and we did. for almost a quarter of a century we have opened our congregation doors, fed and provided a warm and safe place for homeless men to
daughter and your hope stand on the shoulders of the civil rights movement. i don't care who you are. all of this happened and but george wallace while he could not prevent it was a genius in politics, in inventing the phrases that are chillingly contemporary, even today, that when it no longer was respectable to defend segregation, he made it respectable to cut the process and to place the fears and the resentments of the process as it was let loose saying that pointy-headed bureaucrats were telling us how to run our businesses and wearied we could go to school, and that they were in cahoots with a biased national media that had a racial agenda to help pointy-headed liberals concentrate all effective power and the central government in washington. now, if any of that is familiar to you, in contemporary politics, i submit to you that those phrases were invented by one of the great geniuses in modern politics. and concentrated. they were george wallace. and on top of that, wallace had another part of his genius. he insisted in public that he had never made a single comment in his public ca
and it was a civil rights heros by the asian caucus and other and is our great alumni of san francisco state and dany tbloiver was the m c and he was wonderful and but he gave property props and recognition to some of the asian pacific islander communities like [name?] andsure coach yes, i amia who was also a great frequent friend of his as well and filipino labor leaders like larry [name?] and phillip vera cruz to hey had a aian leaders and many others from our history of struggle in the asian and pacific islanderrer community but it was a wonderful program and congratulations to the hero's program and i also p wanted to say that tomorrow another asian and pacific islander event is coming up and dean frank louis from hastings college of law has invites us to the reenactment of the major civil right case of modern europe for asian americaing were a young chinese america man was beaten to dealt by two unemployed auto workers in front of a mc donald restaurant in 1982 and this became spark how many of us became - and is so there will be a reenactment at hastings at 6:00 o'clock tomorrow and it will be
, the civil rights heroine who, in 1955, triggered the montgomery, alabama, bus boycott. she would have turned 100 on monday, february 4th. mrs. park's defiance made her a national legend, the tired seamstress who refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus. but her story is much more complex. scholars would like to study rosa parks' papers, but it turns out they are unavailable for public view. david tereshchuk is our correspondent. >> reporter: when rosa parks died just over seven years ago, prominent national figures celebrated her as the ordinary citizen who herself achieved fame by transforming the cause of civil rights through one simple act. a black woman in montgomery, alabama, refusing to give up her seat on the bus to a white man. but many of mrs. parks' admirers believe her true nature has not been fully recognized since her death. for one thing, too little account is taken, they think, of her strong involvement in the african methodist episcopal church. that involvement, says author of a new parks biography, jeanne theoharis, was matched with a deep faith that called her to act
soldiers in the civil rights movement. >> we take you to the memorial service. plus -- >> they told us -- >> sounds like promising news, but no sign of surrender in the alabama hostage situation. neighbors say why they believe the suspect is holdin >> an emotional day for the community as dozens gathered to honor the late rev. vernon dobson. he moved here as a gunman in the late-1970's. to many, he was known as "pastor," but he will be remembered for the strides he made in the fight for civil rights. in the 1960's, he led protests and boycotts and dedicated the rest of his life to building community organizations. today's memorial service was held inside st. mark's institutional baptist church. reverend dodson was 89 years old. >> a fire in west baltimore sent one person to shock trauma. it happened at a home in the 1300 block of west pratt street. crews rescued a victim from the second floor and one firefighter had to be treated for minor burns. >> still to come tonight, a marriage 12 years in the making. >> the bride wore purple. >> today marks the fifth day that a boy has been held
tonight to the sandy 36. >>> and it's a modern-day civil rights struggle between workers and management in the state of mississippi. i'll tell you why these nissan employees say they're being denied a voice in the workplace. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching there is more hope tonight for 11 million people who are currently living in fear. >> i'm here today because the time has come for common sense, comprehensive immigration reform. the time has come. now is the time. >> president obama went to a las vegas high school today to outline his own immigration reform plan. the cheers from the crowd tell you a lot. there are places in this country where the threat of deportation hangs over the heads of many people. >> the good news is that for the first time in many years, republicans and democrats seem ready to tackle this problem together. members of both parties in both chambers are actively working on a solution. >> so here we have the president praising the framework unveiled by eight democratic and republican senators. president obama is urging using his bully
civil rights struggle. >>> plus, hillary clinton drops a few hints about her future in her state department farewell. those comments are ahead. >>> and 36 senators voted against relief for victims of hurricane sandy. >> it would have been an absolute disgrace for them to change the rules when new york and new jersey -- >> coming up, i'll take the sandy 36 to task with salon's joan walsh. [ male announcer ] red lobster is hitting the streets to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu! oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15! it's our new maine stays! seafood, chicken, and more! ooh! the tilapia with roasted vegetables. i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. that pork chop was great. no more fast food friday's. we're going to go to red lobster... [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99! salad, sandwiches and more. [ sneezes ] [ sniffles ] [ female announcer ] for everything your face has to face. face it with pu
to give this district-required test because we feel this is a civil rights issue. this is a test that was brought to seattle and to complete scandal. -- under complete scandal. the board of the company that produced the test and did not disclose that when the seattle public schools purchased the map tests for over $4 million. it is not me who has a problem with that, it is the state auditor of washington state that came and found that was "an ethics violation" and "conflict of interest." that is the best part of the map test. this test is a test that is not aligned to our curriculum. our kids in ninth grade algebra are getting geometry questions that not being taught to them in that grade. what that means is it is setting them up for failure. we did not get into this job as teachers to set our kids up for failure. what is worse, this evaluation is tied to our in violation. the map test is part of grading teachers. we have kids taking a test that is not tied to what we're teaching the classroom and they can tie that to our evaluation, it is terribly unfair. finally, i think one of
of the protections of our civil rights laws. in most states, there are modest exemptions to this employment at will doctrine around wrongful discharge. when an employer requires somebody to breakable law and order to keep their job or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of some well- defined ridden public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wide latitude because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person or entity that takes the risk and sets up the business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their businesses the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. this is but a small one. i am not saying you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified. in essence, what these laws do, right now they are saving employers from themselves. if they are ignoring all the unemployed workers, they really could be missing the best qualified person for the job. host: from twitter -- guest: that's another place where this discrimination against the unemplo
movement as the next iteration of civil rights struggle. he probably means it. is it relevant? the unskilled immigration we have. you can argue that we are in need of 11 million new or more low skilled laborers. that will depress wages. do you note in state of nevada unemployment is over 10%. that will this do to wages for low-skilled american workers? will depress them. i can't believe the president is getting away with thatch >> on this provision is this a poisep nil >> it is potentially a poison pill. for republicans who themselveses or the voters back at home, supporters believe this amnesty. this is very difficult, the catholic churches who are supporting immigration reform, this is going to stop the bipartisan momentum in its tracks. there is a belief that president obama for tactical successes might do what he can to move the goalpost and move out the the left so it's not too much in the right at the end. maybe that is something democrats think is a shrewd plan. it's obviously going to throw gum in works. white house knows that. >> politically it's an act of sabotage. t
was not so much about lgbt rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 377 (some duplicates have been removed)

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